Sugarcane

Crop Overview

For centuries, farmers have cultivated sugarcane to produce sugar. This remarkable crop is of big importance as a cash crop for families and smallholders in developing countries. Sugarcane is mostly cultivated warm climates; therefore top producers are Brazil, India, China, Thailand, and Pakistan. The main purpose of its cultivation today is also sugar production. However, the use of sugarcane is expanding into the products such as ethanol and biofuel, biomass used for electricity, and bioplastics.

While the average yield of sugarcane worldwide is close to 60 t/ha, some countries manage to produce more than 100 t/ha. However, pests represent one of the biggest threats for farmers who are growing this powerful cash crop. Scientists estimate that insect pests cause almost 20 to 40% of farmer's yield losses. Borers are one of the most significant insect pests that attack sugarcane, thus endangering farmer's productivity.

 

Major Pests & Damage

Early shoot borer

Early shoot borer

(Chilo infescatellus)

Top borer

Top borer

(Scirpophaga excerptalis)

Mites

Mites

(Oligonychus sacchari)

Internode borer

Internode borer

(Chilo sacchariphagus indicus)

Sugarcane Pyrila

Sugarcane Pyrila

(Pyrilla perpusilla)

Thrips

Thrips

(Fulmekiola serrata)

Root borer

Root borer

(Emmalocera depressella)

White Fly

White Fly

(Aleurolobus barodensis)

 

Major Diseases

Red Rot
Red Rot

(Colletotrichum falcatum)

The external symptoms of the disease in the field are not conspicuous unless the interior of the cane stalk is completely rotted. At this stage of damage, though infrequent, the rind loses its bright natural colour and becomes shriveled. Infected plants are detected by yellowing, shriveling and dying of upper leaves.

Pokkah Boeng
Pokkah Boeng

(Fusarium moniliformae and other means)

The earliest symptom of Pokkahboeng is a chlorotic condition towards the base of the young leaves and occasionally on the other parts of the leaf blades. Frequently, a pronounced wrinkling, twisting and shortening of the leaves accompanied the malformation or distortion of the young leaves.

Wilt
Wilt

(Fusarium moniliformae)

Wilt affected canes do not exhibit any rind discoloration as seen in case of red rot, critical examination of the affected canes show loss of luster and paleness on rind. Internally, the affected canes show internodal cavities with varying shades of pinkish to reddish brown or brown discoloration.

Root Knot Nematodes
Root Knot Nematodes

(Meloidogyny spp.)

Root-knot nematodes cause the most severe damage to sugarcane. They are present only in the lighter, sandy soils where nutrients are more limited and moisture stress is more likely, so the crop is more sensitive to root damage.

Whip Smut
Whip Smut

(Ustilago scitaminea)

Plants infected with the fungus usually appear to have thin stalks and are often stunted. They end up tillering much more than normal and this result in leaves that are more slender and much weaker. They sometimes appear more grass-like than non-infected plants.

Major Diseases

Red Rot
Red Rot

(Colletotrichum falcatum)

The external symptoms of the disease in the field are not conspicuous unless the interior of the cane stalk is completely rotted. At this stage of damage, though infrequent, the rind loses its bright natural colour and becomes shriveled. Infected plants are detected by yellowing, shriveling and dying of upper leaves.

Pokkah Boeng
Pokkah Boeng

(Fusarium moniliformae and other means)

The earliest symptom of Pokkahboeng is a chlorotic condition towards the base of the young leaves and occasionally on the other parts of the leaf blades. Frequently, a pronounced wrinkling, twisting and shortening of the leaves accompanied the malformation or distortion of the young leaves.

Wilt
Wilt

(Fusarium moniliformae)

Wilt affected canes do not exhibit any rind discoloration as seen in case of red rot, critical examination of the affected canes show loss of luster and paleness on rind. Internally, the affected canes show internodal cavities with varying shades of pinkish to reddish brown or brown discoloration.

Root Knot Nematodes
Root Knot Nematodes

(Meloidogyny spp.)

Root-knot nematodes cause the most severe damage to sugarcane. They are present only in the lighter, sandy soils where nutrients are more limited and moisture stress is more likely, so the crop is more sensitive to root damage.

Whip Smut
Whip Smut

(Ustilago scitaminea)

Plants infected with the fungus usually appear to have thin stalks and are often stunted. They end up tillering much more than normal and this result in leaves that are more slender and much weaker. They sometimes appear more grass-like than non-infected plants.

Nutritional Deficiency

Phosphorus

Phosphorus

Boron

Boron

Potassium

Potassium

 

Recommended Products & Their Applications

 
Hands in the Soil

Connect with us for more details about this crop.

For other crops and products related help, you can click on any of the below links.