Cotton

Crop Overview

White gold cotton is India’s largest cash crop, accounting for a third of the farm GDP. A large number of rural families in 10 states depend on cotton for their livelihood. India is the world’s second largest producer and consumer of cotton after China. Remunerative prices last season have led to a record acreage and production in India this year.

 

Major Pests & Damage

Pink bollworm

Pink bollworm

(Pectinophora gossypiella)

Aphid

Aphid

(Aphis gossypii)

Mealy bugs

Mealy bugs

(Phenacoccus solenopsis)

Thrips

Thrips

(Frankliniella schultzei)

Mites

Mites

(Tetranychus urticae)

Whitefly

Whitefly

(Trialeurodes vaporariorum)

 

Major Diseases

Wilt
Wilt

(Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.)

Fusarium can cause severe symptoms in susceptible cotton varieties. These include a general wilt, which is especially evident on warm days, and yellowing and necrosis of lower leaf margins. The vascular system of infected plants is discolored brown in affected portions of the tissue.

Anthracnose
Anthracnose

(Collectotricum gossypium)

The most common symptom is boll spotting. Small water soaked, circular, reddish brown depressed spots appear on the bolls. The lint is stained to yellow or brown, becomes a solid brittle mass of fiber. The infected bolls cease to grow and burst and dry up prematurely.

Root Rot
Root Rot

(Phymatotrichum root rot)

Symptoms are most likely to occur from June through September when soil temperatures reach 28 °C (82 °F). The first symptoms are slight yellowing or bronzing of the leaves. The upper-most leaves wilt within 24 to 48 hours after bronzing, followed by wilting of the lower leaves within 72 hours.

Root Knot Nematodes
Root Knot Nematodes

(Meloidogyne spp.)

Sting nematode damage to cotton roots often shows as visible lesions on the root surface. Feeding may lead to the production of tiny roots. The inability to take up water and nutrients leads to wilting, stunting, chlorosis, and death.

Angular Leaf Spot
Angular Leaf Spot

(Xanthomonas axonopodis pv.)

Leaves develop small, angular, brown or straw-colored spots with a yellow halo. Leaf spots dry and drop out, leaving irregularly shaped holes in the leaves. Water soaked tan, small circular spots on bolls.

Major Diseases

Wilt
Wilt

(Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.)

Fusarium can cause severe symptoms in susceptible cotton varieties. These include a general wilt, which is especially evident on warm days, and yellowing and necrosis of lower leaf margins. The vascular system of infected plants is discolored brown in affected portions of the tissue.

Anthracnose
Anthracnose

(Collectotricum gossypium)

The most common symptom is boll spotting. Small water soaked, circular, reddish brown depressed spots appear on the bolls. The lint is stained to yellow or brown, becomes a solid brittle mass of fiber. The infected bolls cease to grow and burst and dry up prematurely.

Root Rot
Root Rot

(Phymatotrichum root rot)

Symptoms are most likely to occur from June through September when soil temperatures reach 28 °C (82 °F). The first symptoms are slight yellowing or bronzing of the leaves. The upper-most leaves wilt within 24 to 48 hours after bronzing, followed by wilting of the lower leaves within 72 hours.

Root Knot Nematodes
Root Knot Nematodes

(Meloidogyne spp.)

Sting nematode damage to cotton roots often shows as visible lesions on the root surface. Feeding may lead to the production of tiny roots. The inability to take up water and nutrients leads to wilting, stunting, chlorosis, and death.

Angular Leaf Spot
Angular Leaf Spot

(Xanthomonas axonopodis pv.)

Leaves develop small, angular, brown or straw-colored spots with a yellow halo. Leaf spots dry and drop out, leaving irregularly shaped holes in the leaves. Water soaked tan, small circular spots on bolls.

Nutritional Deficiency

Magnesium

Magnesium

Zinc

Zinc

Sulphur

Sulphur

 

Recommended Products & Their Applications

 
Hands in the Soil

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